December 7th, 1941 wasn’t just another day on the calendar. It may have started off like any normal day, but that December Sunday very quickly transformed into one of the most important dates in American history. By 0800, there was no denying the significance of the day as Japanese fighters flew in from the Pacific and laid waste to the battleships and airfields of Pearl Harbor and nearby bases.

It became such an important day that countless organizations, communities, and groups were formed across the nation to ensure it would never be forgotten. The attack on Pearl Harbor was the event that pushed the United States into World War II, the event that brought the nation together behind one cause – defending the nation and the world.

Many heroes emerged from the attack. The men and women who were directly touched by the Japanese surprise attack, those who survived and those who didn’t, are vital to America’s history and continued unity. When the country came under attack, millions upon millions came together to make the war effort possible, and if we allow the memory of these servicemen to fade, so too will the significance of December 7th, 1941.

The Sons and Daughters of Pearl Harbor

The Sons and Daughters of Pearl Harbor is an organization dedicated to the continued effort to keep the memory of these heroes alive. On December 6th, 1965, the first proposal for the creation of an organization for Pearl Harbor survivors’ descendants was made at the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association’s national convention. It took another five years and a second proposal for the idea to finally be realized.

Over the course of its years as an active organization, the Sons and Daughters of Pearl Harbor has experienced a growth to over 3,500 members across the United States and the world. As the years go by and further distance us from the distressing memory of the attack, organizations like the Sons and Daughters of Pearl Harbor will continue to play an ever-more-important part in keeping America’s history alive.

Reliving History

Though it’s been more than 75 years since the Pearl Harbor attack, we can still relive it thanks to the exhibits and memorials at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument. Just as the survivors of Pearl Harbor and their descendants would want us to, we can learn all there is to know about the attack, about the men and women who were in service that day, and about the mighty vessels that bore the brunt of Japan’s onslaught.

From the USS Arizona Memorial constructed directly above the wreckage, to the Pacific Aviation Museum, which showcases the aircraft that took part in World War II and beyond, every aspect of Pearl Harbor awaits your discovery and education about the attack.

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